fall

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See also: Fall, Fäll, and fäll

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *pōl-, *spōl- (to fall). Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti, Ancient Greek σφάλλω (sphállō, bring down, destroy, cause to stumble, deceive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

A sign warning about the danger of falling rocks.
  1. (intransitive) To move downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      Thrown from a cliff, the stone fell 100 feet before hitting the ground.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      The rain fell at dawn.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
      He fell to the floor and begged for mercy.
    4. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
      to fall the voice
    3. (UK, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
      to fall a tree
  3. (intransitive) To happen, to change negatively.
    1. (copulative) To become.
      She has fallen ill.
      The children fell asleep in the back of the car.
      When did you first fall in love?
    2. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); said of an instance of a recurring event such as a holiday or date.
      Thanksgiving always falls on a Thursday.
      Last year, Commencement fell on June 3.
    3. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
      Rome fell to the Goths in 410 AD.
    4. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
      This is a monument to all those who fell in the First World War.
    5. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc).
      The candidate's poll ratings fell abruptly after the banking scandal.
      • Sir J. Davies
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Volume 1, pp.284-5
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
      • 2013 July 20, “Old soldiers?”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8845: 
        Whether modern, industrial man is less or more warlike than his hunter-gatherer ancestors is impossible to determine. [] One thing that is true, though, is that murder rates have fallen over the centuries, as policing has spread and the routine carrying of weapons has diminished. Modern society may not have done anything about war. But peace is a lot more peaceful.
    6. (followed by a determining word or phrase) To become; to be affected by or befallen with a calamity; to change into the state described by words following; to become prostrated literally or figuratively (see Usage notes below).
      Our senator fell into disrepute because of the banking scandal.
  4. (transitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
    And so it falls to me to make this important decision.
    The estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.
    • Alexander Pope
      If to her share some female errors fall, / Look on her face, and you'll forget them all.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • John Locke (1632-1705)
      Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
    to fall lambs
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Bible, Hebrews iv. 11
      Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  9. To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
    to fall into error; to fall into difficulties
  10. To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Bible, Genesis iv. 5
      Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • Addison
      I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  11. To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Jonathan Swift
      The Romans fell on this model by chance.
    • Bible, Ruth iii. 18
      Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • H. Spencer
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  12. To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    After arguing, they fell to blows.
    • Jowett (Thucyd.)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  13. To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
    An unguarded expression fell from his lips.

Quotations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

fall (plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • 1908, W. B. M. Ferguson, Zollenstein, Ch.I:
      “I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly North America, obsolete elsewhere, from the falling of leaves during this season) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
    the fall of Rome
  5. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  6. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
    He set up his rival to take the fall.
  7. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting.
  8. See falls
  9. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Statistics[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic

Noun[edit]

fall

  1. prophecy

Breton[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fall

  1. bad

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension[edit]

n10 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fall fallið føll føllini
Accusative fall fallið føll føllini
Dative falli fallinum føllum føllunum
Genitive fals falsins falla fallanna

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fall

  1. Imperative singular of fallen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of fallen.

Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returing a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension[edit]

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Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall - in case
    i alle fall - in any case

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
    fallet är omgivet av skog
    the fall is surrounded by forest
    fallet är sjutton meter
    the water falls seventeen metres; the decline is seventeen metres
  4. a (legal) case
    i alla fall
    anyhow (in all cases)
    i annat fall
    otherwise (in another case)
    i så fall
    if so (in such a case)
    i vilket fall som helst
    in any case
    i vart fall
    in any case

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References[edit]