fard

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Middle French, from Old French fard (make-up, cosmetics), from farder (to apply make-up, use cosmetics), from Old Frankish *farwidōn (to dye, colour), from Proto-Germanic *farwiþōną (to colour), from Proto-Germanic *farwō (colour), from Proto-Indo-European *perḱ- (motley, coloured). Cognate with Old High German farwjan (to colour) (High German Farbe (colour)), Middle Low German varwe (colour) (Low German Farwe (colour)), Latin pulcher (beautiful), Welsh erch (dark brown).

Noun[edit]

fard (uncountable)

  1. Colour or paint used on the face; makeup, war-paint.
    • J. Whitaker
      Painted with French fard.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fard (third-person singular simple present fards, present participle farding, simple past and past participle farded)

  1. (transitive) To paint, as the face or cheeks.
    • Zachary Boyd
      The fairest are but farded like the face of Jezebel.

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French fard (make-up, cosmetics), from farder (to apply make-up, use cosmetics), from Old Frankish *farwidōn (to dye, colour), from Proto-Germanic *farwiþōną (to colour), from Proto-Germanic *farwō (colour), from Proto-Indo-European *perḱ- (motley, coloured). Cognate with Old High German farwjan (to colour), Middle Low German varwe (colour). See more above.

Noun[edit]

fard m (plural fards)

  1. make-up

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

fard m (invariable)

  1. blusher, rouge

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فرد (fard)

Adjective[edit]

fard

  1. odd (not even)

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fardiz.

Noun[edit]

fard f

  1. traffic, journey