fart

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English

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Wikipedia

Etymology

From Middle English ferten, farten, from Old English *feortan (in feorting (verbal noun)), from Proto-Germanic *fertaną (compare German farzen, furzen, Norwegian fjert), from Proto-Indo-European *perd-, *pérde. Cognate to Welsh rhech, Albanian pjerdh, Russian пердеть (perdetʹ), French péter, Ancient Greek πέρδομαι (pérdomai), Sanskrit पर्दते (párdate).

Pronunciation

Verb

fart (third-person singular simple present farts, present participle farting, simple past and past participle farted)

  1. (informal, mildly vulgar) To emit digestive gases from the anus; to flatulate.
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, "A Dialogue between Mad Mullinix and Timothy":
      I fart with twenty ladies by;
      They call me beast; and what care I?
  2. (colloquial, usually as "fart around") To waste time with idle and inconsequential tasks; to go about one's activities in a lackadaisical manner; to be lazy or over-relaxed in one's manner or bearing.

Synonyms

(waste time with aimless activities): futz, fool around, fool about

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

fart (plural farts)

  1. (informal) An emission of digestive gases from the anus; a flatus. [from 15th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12:
      Metrocles somewhat indiscreetly, as he was disputing in his Schole, in presence of his auditory, let a fart, for shame whereof he afterwards kept his house and could not be drawen abroad [].
  2. (colloquial, vulgar) An irritating person; a fool.
  3. (colloquial, vulgar, potentially offensive) (usually as "old fart") An elderly person; especially one perceived to hold old-fashioned views.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Catalan

Etymology

from Latin fartus

Adjective

fart m (feminine farta, masculine plural farts, feminine plural fartes)

  1. stuffed
  2. fed up

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fart/, [fɑːˀd̥]

Noun

fart c (singular definite farten, plural indefinite farter)

  1. (uncountable) speed
    Mange trafikulykker sker på grund af for høj fart. - Many accidents happen because of excessive speed.
  2. (sailing) : trip; journey; trade.
    Der er en stigning i antallet af farter mellem Asien og Europa. - There is an increase in the number of trades between Asia and Europe.
  3. At være på farten - To be on the move.

Derived terms

Inflection

sailing

See also


French

Pronunciation

Noun

fart m (plural farts)

  1. wax (for skis)

External links


Icelandic

Etymology

From Danish fart.

Pronunciation

Noun

fart f (genitive singular fartar, no plural)

  1. (informal) speed
    Það er nú meiri fartin á þér, drengur!
    My, you sure seem to be in a hurry, son!

Declension


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German vart, related to fare (fare, travel).

Noun

fart m (definite singular farten; uncountable)

  1. velocity
  2. movement, motion
  3. transportation
  4. high speed, vigor, drive

Synonyms

Verb

fart

  1. past participle of fare

References

  • “fart” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • fart” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German vart, from Old Saxon fard, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz. Cognate with Swedish färd, Dutch vaart, German Fahrt.

Pronunciation

Noun

fart c

  1. speed
    • 1917, Bible, Jeremiah 48:16:
      Snart kommer Moabs ofärd, och hans olycka hastar fram med fart.
      Soon comes Moab’s calamity, and his misery hastes with speed.

Declension

Usage notes

  • As a suffix in certain compounds (listed separately below) this word takes on the meaning of road, ramp, or journey, just like German Fahrt or Swedish färd, rather than the standalone meaning of speed. Similar compounds with the suffix -färd exist, with slightly different meaning.
  • In many compounds and in more formal or scientific use, speed translates to hastighet (velocity) rather than fart.

Derived terms

compounds with the meaning of road, ramp, or journey

See also