feeble

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English feble, from Anglo-Norman feble (weak, feeble), from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable), from flēre (to weep), akin to fluere (to flow); see fluent.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

feeble (comparative feebler, superlative feeblest)

  1. Deficient in physical strength; weak; infirm; debilitated.
    Though she appeared old and feeble, she could still throw a ball.
    • 2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France”, BBC Sport:
      France were transformed from the feeble, divided unit that had squeaked past Wales in the semi-final, their half-backs finding the corners with beautifully judged kicks from hand, the forwards making yards with every drive and a reorganised Kiwi line-out beginning to malfunction.
  2. Lacking force, vigor, or efficiency in action or expression; faint.
    That was a feeble excuse for an example.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

feeble (third-person singular simple present feebles, present participle feebling, simple past and past participle feebled)

  1. (obsolete) To make feeble; to enfeeble.

References[edit]