fiar

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See feuar.

Noun[edit]

fiar (plural fiars)

  1. (Scotland, law) One in whom the property of an estate is vested, subject to the estate of a liferenter.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I am fiar of the lands; she a life renter.
  2. The price of grain, as legally fixed, in the counties of Scotland, on an annual basis.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ferrum. Compare Italian ferro, Romanian and Romansch fier, Friulian fiêr, French fer, Spanish hierro.

Noun[edit]

fiar m

  1. iron

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

fiar m (genitive fiair, nominative plural fiara)

  1. slant, tilt, bias, obliquity
  2. bend, twist; crookedness, perverseness

Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fiar

  1. slanting, tilted, oblique, diagonal, crosswise
  2. bent, warped, crooked, perverse

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (present analytic fiarann, future analytic fiarfaidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiartha)

  1. slant, tilt, veer, turn
  2. bend, twist, distort

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fiar fhiar bhfiar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately from Latin filum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. to spin (thread)
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fidere, present active infinitive of fidō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. (Portugal) to trust
Conjugation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb[edit]

fiar (past dh'fhiar, future fiaraidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiarte)

  1. bend (become bended)
  2. bend, slant, twist

Adjective[edit]

fiar

  1. bent, crooked
  2. slanting, oblique
  3. squinting (of an eye)
  4. cunning, sly

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin root *fidare, from Latin fīdere, present active infinitive of fīdō.

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fie, past participle fiado)

  1. to guarantee
  2. to sell on credit, give credit, put on the slate
  3. to entrust
  4. to confide
  5. to trust

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: stressed í in certain conjugations; monosyllabic infinitives receive no written accent in certain conjugations.

Related terms[edit]