flag

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English[edit]

Commons
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Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /flæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /fleɪɡ/, /flɛɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English flag, flagge (flag), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (name for a baby's garment) and Old English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Related to Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship's flag). Compare also Middle English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter in the wind), Old Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (to flutter), Old High German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Middle English flakeren (to move quickly to and fro), Old English flacor (fluttering, flying). More at flack, flacker.

a flag

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
  2. An exact representation of a flag (for example: a digital one used in websites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
  5. The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
  6. (computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
  7. (computer science) In a command line interface, a notation requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
  8. (UK) An abbreviation for capture the flag.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (computer science: true-or-false value): Boolean
  • (computer science: CLI notation): switch
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
    • 2011 January 8, Chris Bevan, “Arsenal 1 - 1 Leeds”, BBC:
      Walcott was, briefly, awarded a penalty when he was upended in the box but referee Phil Dowd reversed his decision because Bendtner had been flagged offside.
  3. (often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.
    I've flagged up the need for further investigation into this.
    Users of the Internet forum can flag others' posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To signal (an event).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug option before running the program.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse.[1]

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.
    His strength flagged toward the end of the race.
  2. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
    • T. Moore
      as loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast
  3. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • Echard
      Nothing so flags the spirits.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Of uncertain origin; compare Danish flæg.

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
    • before 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There is a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic flag

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To lay down flagstones.
    • Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag (plural flags)

  1. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
  2. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
  3. The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
  4. (music) A hook attached to the stem of a written note that assigns its rhythmic value

References[edit]

  1. ^ flag” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag n (singular definite flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (cloth)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

flag

  1. Imperative of flage.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flag.

Noun[edit]

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. area of ground stripped of turf

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]