flay

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English flayen, flaien, fleien, from Old English *flīeġan ("to cause to fly, put to flight, frighten"; found only in compounds: āflīeġan), from Proto-Germanic *flaugijaną (to let fly, cause to fly), causitive of Proto-Germanic *fleuganą (to fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plew-k-, *plew- (to run, flow, swim, fly). Cognate with Old High German arflaugjan ("to frighten, cause to flee"; whence Middle High German ervlougen (to put to flight, drive away, expel)), Icelandic fleygja (to throw away, discard), Gothic 𐌿𐍃-𐍆𐌻𐌰𐌿𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (us-flaugjan, to cause to fly).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

flay (third-person singular simple present flays, present participle flaying, simple past and past participle flayed)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To cause to fly; put to flight; drive off (by frightening).
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To frighten; scare; terrify.
  3. (intransitive, UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To be fear-stricken.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

flay (plural flays)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A fright; a scare.
  2. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Fear; a source of fear; a formidable matter; a fearsome or repellent-looking individual.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English flean from Proto-Germanic *flahaną. Cognate with Old Norse flá (to flay), whence Danish flå.

Verb[edit]

flay (third-person singular simple present flays, present participle flaying, simple past flayed, past participle flayed or flain (obsolete))

  1. to strip skin off
  2. to lash
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]