fold

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See also: -fold and föld

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, from Proto-Germanic *falþaną (to fold), from Proto-Indo-European *palo-, *plō- (to fold), compare Albanian palë. Akin to Dutch vouwen, German falten, Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌻𐌸𐌰𐌽 (falþan), Old Norse falda (Danish folde).

Verb[edit]

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past folded or (obsolete) feld, past participle folded or (rare) folden)

  1. (transitive) To bend (any thin material, such as paper) over so that it comes in contact with itself.
  2. (transitive) To make the proper arrangement (in a thin material) by bending.
    If you fold the sheets, they'll fit more easily in the drawer.
  3. (intransitive) To become folded; to form folds.
    Cardboard doesn't fold very easily.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To fall over; to be crushed.
    The chair folded under his enormous weight.
  5. (transitive) To enclose within folded arms (see also enfold).
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      He put out his arms and folded her to his breast. And for a while she lay there sobbing. He looked at us over her bowed head, with eyes that blinked damply above his quivering nostrils. His mouth was set as steel.
  6. (intransitive) To give way on a point or in an argument.
  7. (intransitive, poker) To withdraw from betting.
    With no hearts in the river and no chance to hit his straight, he folded.
  8. (transitive, cooking) To stir gently, with a folding action.
    Fold the egg whites into the batter.
  9. (intransitive, business) Of a company, to cease to trade.
    The company folded after six quarters of negative growth.
  10. To double or lay together, as the arms or the hands.
    He folded his arms in defiance.
  11. To cover or wrap up; to conceal.
    • Shakespeare
      Nor fold my fault in cleanly coined excuses.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

fold (plural folds)

  1. An act of folding.
  2. A bend or crease.
    • Francis Bacon
      mummies [] shrouded in a number of folds of linen
    • J. D. Dana
      Folds are most common in the rocks of mountainous regions.
  3. Any correct move in origami.
  4. (newspapers) The division between the top and bottom halves of a broadsheet: headlines above the fold will be readable in a newsstand display; usually the fold.
  5. (by extension, web design) The division between the part of a web page visible in a web browser window without scrolling; usually the fold.
  6. (geology) The bending or curving of one or a stack of originally flat and planar surfaces, such as sedimentary strata, as a result of plastic (i.e. permanent) deformation.
  7. (computing, programming) In functional programming, any of a family of higher-order functions that process a data structure recursively to build up a value.
  8. That which is folded together, or which enfolds or envelops; embrace.
    • Shakespeare
      Shall from your neck unloose his amorous fold.
  9. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, "[1]", BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      Having suffered the loss of Rooney just as he had returned to the fold, Moyes' mood will not have improved as Liverpool took the lead in the third minute.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fold, fald, from Old English fald, falæd, falod (fold, stall, stable, cattle-pen), from Proto-Germanic *faludaz (enclosure). Akin to Scots fald, fauld (an enclosure for livestock), Dutch vaalt (dung heap), Middle Low German valt, vālt (an inclosed space, a yard), Danish fold (pen for herbivorous livestock), Swedish fålla (corral, pen, pound).

Noun[edit]

fold (plural folds)

  1. A pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals.
    • Milton
      Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, Lord Stranleigh Abroad[2]:
      “I came down like a wolf on the fold, didn’t I ?  Why didn’t I telephone ?  Strategy, my dear boy, strategy. This is a surprise attack, and I’d no wish that the garrison, forewarned, should escape. …”
  2. (figuratively) Home, family.
  3. (religion, Christian) A church congregation, a church, the Christian church as a whole, the flock of Christ.
    John, X, 16: "Other sheep I have which are not of this fold."
  4. (obsolete) A boundary or limit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Creech to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past and past participle folded)

  1. To confine sheep in a fold.
    The star that bids the shepherd fold — Milton.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English folde (earth, land, country, district, region, territory, ground, soil, clay), from Proto-Germanic *fuldǭ (ground, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (field, plain). Cognate with Norwegian and Icelandic fold (land, earth, meadow).

Noun[edit]

fold (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal, poetic or obsolete) The Earth; earth; land, country.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

from Old Norse faldr (seam).

Noun[edit]

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folder)

  1. fold
  2. crease
  3. wrinkle
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folde)

  1. fold, pen
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

fold n

  1. multiple

Etymology 4[edit]

See folde (to fold).

Verb[edit]

fold

  1. Imperative of folde.

See also[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fold.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fold f (genitive singular foldar, nominative plural foldir)

  1. (poetic) earth, ground, land

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a common Germanic root; probably from the same Proto-Indo-European root as the English words "field" and "fold" (as in "pen for animals", "of the fold").

Noun[edit]

fold f

  1. (poetic) earth, land; field
    • The Alvíssmál, verses 9 and 10:
      Hvé sú jǫrð heitir, / er liggr fyr alda sonum / heimi hverjum í?
      [] Jǫrð heitir með mǫnnum, / en með Ásum fold, / kalla vega Vanir.
      How is the earth named, / that which lies before the sons of men, / in each of the worlds?
      {{..}} "Earth" it is named among men, / but among the Æsir "Field", / the Vanir call it "Ways".