fon

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See also: Fon

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fon, fonne, of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish fåne (a fool, idiot, prat) (compare Swedish fånig (foolish)), Icelandic fáni (a buoyant, high-flying person, literally a standard, flag), from Proto-Germanic *fanô (cloth, rag), from Proto-Indo-European *pān- (fabric). Cognate with Old English fana (a banner, standard). More at vane.

Noun[edit]

fon (plural fons)

  1. (obsolete) A fool or idiot.

Adjective[edit]

fon (comparative fonner, superlative fonnest)

  1. (obsolete) Foolish; simple; silly.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fonnen, from fon, fonne (fool).

Verb[edit]

fon (third-person singular simple present fons, present participle fonning, simple past and past participle fonned)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To be foolish or simple; act like a fool; dote.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

fon (plural fons)

  1. A chieftain or king of a region of Cameroon.

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

fon

  1. Third-person singular present indicative form of fondre.
  2. Second-person singular imperative form of fondre.

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

fon m (uncountable)

  1. Fon (language)

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fōn

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐍉𐌽

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fond (bottom)

Noun[edit]

fon

  1. bottom

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *puna (to spin, twist).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fon

  1. to spin

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

With verb prefixes
Expressions

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally a brandname, from German Fön, from Föhn, a warm, dry wind.

Noun[edit]

fon m (invariable)

  1. hairdryer, blowdryer

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

fon

  1. rafsi of fonxa.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fanhaną, from Proto-Indo-European *pang-, *pank-. Cognate with Old Frisian , Old Saxon fahan, Old Dutch fān (Dutch vangen), Old High German fahan (German fangen (catch)), Old Norse (Danish and Swedish ), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌷𐌰𐌽 (fahan). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin pangō (fix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fōn

  1. to seize, take

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *afana, whence also Old Saxon fan

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. from

Old Saxon[edit]

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. Alternative form of fan.

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare West Frisian fan, German von.

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. from
  2. of

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fo + an

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. under the
  2. under their

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek φωνή (fōnḗ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. (linguistics) phone
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French fond.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. basis, foundation
  2. (painting) the first layer that lays the foundation for the painting
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from)

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. from
  2. of (belonging to)