for-

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English for-, vor-, from Old English for-, fer-, fær-, fyr- (far, away, completely, prefix), from the merger of Proto-Germanic *fra- ("away, away from"; see fro, from) and *fur-, *far- (through, completely, fully), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. Cognate with Scots for-, West Frisian fer-, for-, Dutch ver-, German ver-, Swedish för-, Danish for-, Norwegian for-, Latin per-. More at for.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (no longer productive) Meaning "far", "away"; "from", "out" e.g. forbid, forget, forsay; forbear, fordeem.
  2. (no longer productive) Meaning "completely", "to the fullest extent" e.g. fordo; superseded by combinations with "up" in senses where no upward movement is involved, e.g. forgive = give up (one's offenses), forgather = "gather up", forbeat = "beat up", etc.
  3. (dialectal) Very; excessively.
    forolded (very old)
    fornigh (very near)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French for-, partially from Late Latin forīs, taken as an adaptation of the Late Latin adverb forīs (outdoors, outside) and used to calque Frankish words prefixed by *fur- (for-) (compare Late Latin foris facere (to do wrong) = Old High German firwirken (to do wrong), Late Latin forisfactus (evil deed) = Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐍅𐌰𐌿𐌷𐍄𐍃 (frawauhts, evil deed), Late Latin foris consiliare (to mislead) = Old High German firleitan (to mislead), etc.), and partially continuing from Proto-Germanic *fur-, *fer-, *fra- (away, from, off), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. See for-. Related to French fors (except), French hors (outside).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (nonproductive) prefix used to express error, exclusion, or inadequacy.

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. previous, before, first, pre-
    for- + síða (page) ⇒ forsíða (front page)
  2. (emphatic) extremely
  3. negative meaning

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *fer-, *fur-, *fra- (away, far), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- with a variety of meanings including ‘rejection, destruction, prohibition’. Cognate with Old Frisian for-, Old Saxon far-, for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, far- (German ver-), and, outside Germanic, with Ancient Greek περί (perí), Latin per-, Old Church Slavonic пре- (pre-) (Russian пере- (pere-)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. forming verbs from verbs with various senses especially ‘wrongly, away from, astray, abstention, prohibition, perversion, destruction’
    forwyrcan (to do wrong, sin)
    forstandan (to defend, protect, stand for)
    forweorpan (to throw away, cast away, reject)
    forstelan (to steal away, deprive)
    fordēman (to condemn)
    forlǣdan (to mislead)
  2. used to create intensified adjectives and verbs from other adjectives and verbs, with the sense of completely or fully. Compare Modern English use of up
    forblāwan (to blow up, inflate)
    forstoppian (to stop up, block, occlude)
    forworen (decayed, decrepit)
    forbrocen (broken down"; "broken up)
  3. very
    forlȳtel (very little)

Old Saxon[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. Alternative form of far-