friable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin friābilis, from friō (to crumble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

friable (comparative more friable, superlative most friable)

  1. Easily broken into small fragments, crumbled, or reduced to powder.
    • 1977, Angela Carter, The Passion of New Eve:
      Spiders had woven their vague trapezes between the friable heads of dead peonies in enormous glass jars streaked with tide marks where the water had evaporated long ago.
    • 1983, Lawrence Durrell, Sebastian, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 1020:
      This light, friable type of material offered excellent insulation against both desert heat and also the cold of darkness during the winter.
  2. (of soil) Loose and large-grained in consistency.
  3. (of poisons) Likely to crumble and become airborne, thus becoming a health risk
    • April 1987, Old-House Journal
      It is when asbestos-containing products are friable that hazardous asbestos fibers are likely to be released and sent airborne.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (easily broken into small fragments): crumbly

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

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References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin friābilis, from friō (to crumble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

friable (masculine and feminine, plural friables)

  1. crumbly
  2. crummy, pitiful

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • friable” in the Portail lexical, Centre National de Ressources Textuelles et Lexicales, 2014.

External links[edit]