frisk

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English frisk, from Old French frisque (lively, jolly, blithe, fine, spruce, gay), of Germanic origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch frisc (fresh) or Old High German frisc (fresh), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (fresh). Cognate with Icelandic frískur (frisky, fresh). More at fresh.

Alternative etymology derives frisk from an alteration (due to Old French fresche (fresh)) of Old French fricque, frique (smart, strong, playful, bright), from Gothic [script?] (friks, greedy, hungry), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz, *frakaz (greedy, active), from Proto-Indo-European *preg- (greedy, fierce). Cognate with Middle Dutch vrec (greedy, avaricious), German frech (insolent), Old English frec (greedy, eager, bold, daring, dangerous). More at freak.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frisk

  1. Lively; brisk; frolicsome; frisky.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

frisk (plural frisks)

  1. A frolic; a fit of wanton gaiety; a gambol: a little playful skip or leap.

Verb[edit]

frisk (third-person singular simple present frisks, present participle frisking, simple past and past participle frisked)

  1. To frolic, gambol, skip, dance, leap.
  2. To search somebody by feeling his or her body and clothing.
    The police frisked the suspiciously-acting individual and found a knife as well as a bag of marijuana.

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The term frisk is slightly less formal than search.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German vrisch.

Adjective[edit]

frisk (neuter frisk or friskt, definite and plural friske)

  1. fresh
  2. cheerful, lively
  3. fit, sprightly

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frisk (comparative friskare, superlative friskast)

  1. healthy
  2. fresh; refreshing
    friska luften
    (the) fresh air

Declension[edit]