fust

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See also: füst

English[edit]

Verb[edit]

fust (third-person singular simple present fusts, present participle fusting, simple past and past participle fusted)

  1. (obsolete) To decay.
    • 1602 : William Shakespeare, Hamlet , act IV scene 4
      Sure he that made us with such large discourse
      Looking before and after, gave us not
      That capability and godlike reason
      To fust in us unused.

Noun[edit]

fust (plural fusts)

  1. A strong musty smell; mustiness.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fust n (plural fusten, diminutive fustje n)

  1. cask (e.g. containing beer)

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

see estre

Verb[edit]

fust

  1. Third-person singular past historic of estre
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin fustis.

Noun[edit]

fust m (oblique plural fuz or futz, nominative singular fuz or futz, nominative plural fust)

  1. wood (material from a plant)
  2. wooden beam or plank
  3. bole (part of a tree trunk)
    • circa 1176, Chrétien de Troyes, Cligès:
      Ausi come escorce sanz fust
      Just like bark without a tree trunk
  4. club (weapon)
    • 1981, Allan Pease (translation by Maricel Ford), El lenguaje del cuerpo:
      Escuz et hiaumes et haubers.
      Nes garantist ne fuz ne fers
      Shields and helmets and armor.
      Couldn't protect neither clubs nor swords

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *funstiz, whence also Old English fyst, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pnsti-, a variant of *pnksti- ‘fist’, *pn̥kʷ-sti (fist), a derivative of *pénkʷe (five). Cognate with Old Frisian fest, Old Saxon fūst (Dutch vuist) and with Russian пясть ‘palm of the hand’, Polish pięść ‘fist’, Serbian pest 'fist' and prst 'finger'.

Noun[edit]

fūst f

  1. fist

Descendants[edit]