gad

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Taboo deformation of God.

Interjection[edit]

gad

  1. An exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to 'by God', 'goodness gracious', 'for goodness' sake'.
    1905 That's the trouble -- it was too easy for you -- you got reckless -- thought you could turn me inside out, and chuck me in the gutter like an empty purse. But, by gad, that ain't playing fair: that's dodging the rules of the game. — Edith Wharton, House of Mirth.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English gadden (to hurry, to rush about).

Verb[edit]

gad (third-person singular simple present gads, present participle gadding, simple past and past participle gadded)

  1. (intransitive) To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
    • 1852, Alice Cary, Clovernook ....
      This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XIII:
      If you are on the board of governors of a school and have contracted to supply an orator for the great day of the year, you can be forgiven for feeling a trifle jumpy when you learn that the silver-tongued one has gadded off to the metropolis, leaving no word as to when he will be returning, if ever.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse gaddr (goad, spike).

Noun[edit]

gad (plural gads)

  1. A sharp-pointed object; a goad.
    • 1885, Detroit Free Press., December 17
      Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
  2. (obsolete) A metal bar.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book XV:
      they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
    • Moxon
      Flemish steel [] some in bars and some in gads.
  3. A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock, especially in mining.
    • Shakespeare
      I will go get a leaf of brass, / And with a gad of steel will write these words.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 327:
      Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  4. (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, perhaps equivalent to the bloom, perhaps weighing around 100 pounds.
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, p. 146.
      Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  5. A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairholt to this entry?)
  6. (UK, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

gad

  1. past tense of gide

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gad

  1. rafsi of gadri.

Middle Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon, from Proto-Germanic *gudą.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gād m

  1. god

Navajo[edit]

Navajo Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nv

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [kɑ̀t]~[kɣɑ̀t]

Noun[edit]

gad

  1. juniper, cedar

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad m

  1. reptile

Declension[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

gad

  1. you (informal singular, direct object)
    Bruidhinn nas labhaire, chan eil mi gad chluinntinn ceart. ― Speak louder, I don't hear you well.

Usage notes[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad m (genitive gaid, plural gaid or gadan)

  1. withy, withe

Conjunction[edit]

gad

  1. Alternative form of ged.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ

Noun[edit]

gȁd m (Cyrillic spelling га̏д)

  1. a repulsive person
  2. scoundrel
  3. cad
  4. asshole
  5. snake; lizard

Declension[edit]


Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad

  1. (eastern dialect) An immature coconut.

Usage notes[edit]

Gad or smol koknat is the third stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by giru (eastern dialect) or musu koknat (western dialect), and followed by kopespes.


Veps[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad

  1. snake

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad (plural gads)

  1. garden

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

gad f

  1. Mutated form of cad.