gair

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See also: gáir

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish gairid, from Proto-Celtic *garyo- (compare Middle Welsh gardu (groan), geir (word)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r- (to shout, call). Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English ċearu (sorrow).

Verb[edit]

gair (present analytic gaireann, future analytic gairfidh, verbal noun gairm, past participle gairthe)

  1. to call
  2. (literary) to invoke
  3. to acclaim
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  1. gair ar (to call upon, summon, invoke)
  2. gair de (to name, proclaim, inaugurate)

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected forms of gar (near; nearness).

Adjective[edit]

gair

  1. vocative masculine singular of gar
  2. genitive masculine singular of gar
  3. (archaic) dative feminine singular of gar

Noun[edit]

gair

  1. genitive singular of gar

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gair ghair ngair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare to English gore (third sense).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gair (plural gairs)

  1. (archaic) A strip of grass on a hillside, especially bright green and fertile grass.

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh geir, from Proto-Celtic *garyo- (word, speech) (compare Breton and Cornish ger), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r-. Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English ċearu (sorrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gair m (plural geiriau)

  1. word

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gair air ngair unchanged