gal

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See also: gal., Gal, GAL, Gal., -gal, gal-, and gäl

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From gallon.

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gal or gals)

  1. A gallon.

Etymology 2[edit]

Representing a nonstandard pronunciation of girl.

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gals)

  1. (colloquial, dated) An adolescent girl or young woman.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from galileo

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gals, symbol Gal)

  1. A galileo.

Anagrams[edit]

See also[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch see below

Noun[edit]

gal (??? please provide the plural!)

  1. The bodily fluid bile

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal f (uncountable)

  1. The bodily fluid bile

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From gala (to crow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal n (genitive singular gals, no plural)

  1. crowing (of a rooster)
  2. yelling

Declension[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gal, from Proto-Celtic *galā (ability) (compare Welsh gallu (be able)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal f, m (genitive gaile, nominative plural gala)

  1. warlike ardor
  2. valor, fury
  3. vapor, steam
  4. boiling heat
  5. puff, whiff (of smoke, hot air)
  6. fit, bout, turn
  7. demand

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gal ghal ngal
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

gál

  1. maybe, perhaps

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gal

  1. rafsi of galtu.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gāl (lust, luxury, wantonness, folly, levity), see below.

Adjective[edit]

gal

  1. lascivious, lustful
    nawt ane euch fleschlich hondlunge, ah ᵹetten euch gal word ... — Ancrene Wisse, c1230
    Sweche pinen he þolien schal þat her wes of his fles ful gal And wolde louien his fleses wil. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300
  2. overly fond of
    Gripes freteþ hoere mawen And hoere inward everuidel, Ne be þe þarof no so gal, Eft hoe werpeþ al in al. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary, gol

Nalca[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. tree

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse galinn, from gala (sing bewitching songs, in actuality bewitched by magical singing)

Adjective[edit]

gal (masculine gal; feminine gal; neuter galt; plural gale; comparative galere; superlative galest)

  1. insane; crazy; out of one's mind; mad
  2. incorrect; erroneous; wrong; illegal; morally reproachable

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (definite singular galen, indefinite plural galer, definite plural galene)

  1. (instance of) rooster's crowing

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. Imperative of gale

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gallus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gals)

  1. A cock, rooster

Related terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰoylos (frothing, tempestuous, wanton). Cognate with Old Saxon gēl, Dutch geil (salacious, lustful), Old High German geil (German geil (lustful)), Old Norse geiligr (beautiful). The Indo-European root may also be the source of Lithuanian gailùs (sharp, biting), Russian зело (zelo, very).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gāl (comparative gālra, superlative gālost)

  1. wanton, lustful; wicked
    And se Iouis wearð swa swyðe gal þæt he on his agenre swyster gewifode. And Jove became so depraved that he married his own sister. (Wulfstan, De Falsis Deis)

Declension[edit]

Weak Strong
singular plural singular plural
m n f m n f m n f
nominative gāla gāle gāle gālan nom. gāl gāle gāl gāla, -e
accusative gālan gāle gālan acc. gālne gāl gāle gāle gāl gāla, -e
genitive gālan gālra, gālena gen. gāles gāles gālre gālra
dative gālan gālum dat. gālum gālum gālre gālum
instrumental gāle



Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (oblique plural gaus or gax or gals, nominative singular gaus or gax or gals, nominative plural gal)

  1. A rock

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin

Noun[edit]

gal m

  1. gallium
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Named in honour of Galileo Galilei

Noun[edit]

gal m

  1. A galileo
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

see gala

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. genitive plural of gala

Rohingya[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. A mouth

Romagnol[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural ghël)

  1. rooster (male domestic fowl)
    • September 2012, Loris Pasini, E’ gal in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
      E’ gal
      The rooster

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Gallus.

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gali)

  1. a Gaul

Etymology 2[edit]

From French gal.

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gali)

  1. (physics) unit of measurement of acceleration, equal to 1 centimeter per second squared

See also[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (genitive gail)

  1. Verbal noun of gail.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *galъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡâːl/
  • Hyphenation: gal

Adjective[edit]

gȃl (Cyrillic spelling га̑л)

  1. (dated) black, dark (physical attributes)
  2. (dated) dark fur

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. present tense of gala.
  2. imperative of gala.