gan

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See gin

Verb[edit]

gan

  1. simple past tense of gin

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English gān (to go).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gan (third-person singular simple present gans, present participle gannin, simple past went, past participle gone)

  1. (obsolete outside Northumbrian) To go.

References[edit]

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [3]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4[4]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Verb[edit]

gan

  1. Alternative spelling of gaon

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cen (besides; without), from Proto-Celtic *kina (besides); compare Welsh am-gen (otherwise), Breton ken (otherwise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

gan

  1. without
  2. not (in conjunction with a verbal noun)

Usage notes[edit]

Triggers lenition of b, c, g, m, p on unmodified nouns, e.g. gan phingin ‘without a penny’. Does not trigger lenition on modified nouns, e.g. gan pingin ina phóca ‘without a penny in his pocket’. In the meaning ‘not’, does not trigger lenition on either a verbal noun or on the direct object of the verbal noun, e.g. gan ceannach ‘not to buy’, gan pingin a shaothrú ‘not to earn a penny’.

Unlike most Irish prepositions, gan is followed by the nominative case of nouns, not the dative, and it does not form prepositional pronouns: gan an t-arán ‘without the bread’, gan ‘without me’.


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gan

  1. rōmaji reading of がん

Kurdish[edit]

Verb[edit]

gan (present stem -gê-)

  1. to have sex with somebody, to fuck somebody

Noun[edit]

gan ?

  1. having sex, fucking

Latvian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. both, and

Usage notes[edit]

Used in pairs: gan jauna, gan skaista "both young and beautiful"


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gan

  1. rafsi of ganra.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of gàn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). Compare Old Saxon gān, Old English gān, Old Frisian gān, Old High German gān, gēn, Old Norse .

Verb[edit]

gān

  1. to go

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). The verb was defective in Germanic and may only have existed in the present tense. Cognate with Old Frisian gān (West Frisian gean), Old Saxon gān (Dutch Low Saxon gan, gahn), Old Dutch gān (Dutch gaan), Old High German gān, gēn (German gehen), Old Norse (Danish and Swedish ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gān

  1. to go

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). Compare Old English gān, Old Saxon gān, Old Dutch gān, Old High German gān, gēn, Old Norse .

Verb[edit]

gān

  1. to go

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian: (Mooring) gunge, (Föhr-Amrum) gung
  • Saterland Frisian: gunge
  • West Frisian: gean

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). Compare Old English gān, Old Dutch gān, Old Frisian gān, Old High German gān, gēn, Old Norse .

Verb[edit]

gān

  1. to go

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Old English gān (to go).

Verb[edit]

tae gan (third-person singular simple present gans, present participle gan, simple past went or wett, past participle been)

  1. Present participle of gan (to go).

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

gan

  1. them (direct object)
    A bheil sibh gan creidsinn? ― Do you believe them?

Usage notes[edit]

  • Before words beginning with b, f, m or p gam is used instead.

Related terms[edit]


Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic kan (blood), from Proto-Turkic *kān, *Kiān (blood).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gan (definite accusative gany, plural ganlar)

  1. blood

Declension[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *t-kaːn

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gan

  1. liver

Derived terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gan (plural gans)

  1. (male or female) goose

Declension[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Preposition[edit]

gan

  1. with
  2. by (authorship)
  3. (North Wales) to indicate possession
    Mae gen i wallt hir.
    I have long hair.
  4. used with verbal noun to indicate an action simultaneous with that of the main verb
    • 1993, Gareth King, Modern Welsh: A Comprehensive Grammar, London: Routledge, ISBN 0-415-09269-8, p. 131:
      Aeth o gwmpas y stafell gan ofyn yr un cwestiwn i bawb.
      She went around the room asking everyone the same question.
Usage notes[edit]

See [5] for more information.

Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

Noun[edit]

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
can gan nghan chan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.