gaster

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin gaster, Ancient Greek γαστήρ (gastḗr)

Noun[edit]

gaster (plural gasters)

  1. the stomach
  2. the part of the abdomen behind the petiole in hymenopterous insects

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek γαστήρ (gastḗr).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaster f (genitive gasteris); third declension

  1. belly

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative gaster gasterēs
genitive gasteris gasterum
dative gasterī gasteribus
accusative gasterem gasterēs
ablative gastere gasteribus
vocative gaster gasterēs

Noun[edit]

gaster f (genitive gastrī); second declension

  1. belly

Inflection[edit]

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
nominative gaster gastrī
genitive gastrī gastrōrum
dative gastrō gastrīs
accusative gastrum gastrōs
ablative gastrō gastrīs
vocative gaster
gastre
gastrī

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin vastāre, present active infinitive of vastō. The initial g is under the influence of Frankish *wuostjan, *wuastjan, itself from Latin vastō or from the same pre-Latin source.

Verb[edit]

gaster

  1. to waste (not make good use of)
  2. to destroy

Synonyms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vastāre, present active infinitive of vastō. The initial g is under the influence of Frankish *wuostjan, *wuastjan, itself from Latin vastō or from the same pre-Latin source.

Verb[edit]

gaster

  1. to waste (not make good use of)
  2. to destroy

Synonyms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

  • This verb conjugates the same as a verb ending in -er. In addition, the forms that would normally end in *-sts, *-stt are reduced to just -z, -st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]