gate

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See also: -gate, gâte, gâté, gåte, and gatě

English[edit]

A gate.
English Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia en

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening) (compare Swedish/Dutch gat, Low German Gaat, Gööt), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰed-ye/o (to defecate) (compare Albanian dhjes, Ancient Greek χέζω (khézō), Old Armenian ձետ (jet, tail), Avestan [script?] (zadah, rump)).

Noun[edit]

gate (plural gates)

  1. ​A doorlike structure outside a house.
  2. Doorway, opening, or passage in a fence or wall.
  3. Movable barrier.
    The gate in front of the railroad crossing went up after the train had passed.
  4. (computing) A logical pathway made up of switches which turn on or off. Examples are and, or, nand, etc.
  5. (cricket) The gap between a batsman's bat and pad.
    Singh was bowled through the gate, a very disappointing way for a world-class batsman to get out
  6. The amount of money made by selling tickets to a concert or a sports event.
  7. (flow cytometry) A line that separates particle type-clusters on two-dimensional dot plots.
  8. passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark.
  9. (electronics) The controlling terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).
  10. In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.
  11. (metalworking) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mould; the ingate.
  12. The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece. Also written geat and git.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

gate (third-person singular simple present gates, present participle gating, simple past and past participle gated)

  1. To keep something inside by means of a closed gate.
  2. To ground someone.
  3. (biochemistry) To open a closed ion channel.[1]
  4. (transitive) To furnish with a gate.
  5. (transitive) To turn (an image intensifier) on and off selectively as needed, or to avoid damage. See autogating.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Cognate with Danish gade, Swedish gata, German Gasse (lane).

Noun[edit]

gate (plural gates)

  1. (now Scotland, northern UK) A way, path.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I was going to be an honest man; but the devil has this very day flung first a lawyer, and then a woman, in my gate.
  2. (obsolete) A journey.
  3. (Northern England) A street; now used especially as a combining form to make the name of a street.
  4. (UK, Scotland, dialect, archaic) manner; gait

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alberts, Bruce; et al. "Figure 11-21: The gating of ion channels." In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ed. Senior, Sarah Gibbs. New York: Garland Science, 2002 [cited 18 December 2009]. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=mboc4&part=A1986&rendertype=figure&id=A2030.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

gate

  1. plural form of gat

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English gate, from Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening). Doublette with Dutch gat (hole).

Noun[edit]

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. airport gate

Etymology 2[edit]

From English Watergate.

Noun[edit]

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. (in compounds) scandal

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gâter (to spoil).

Verb[edit]

gate

  1. spoil

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gata

Noun[edit]

gate f, m (definite singular gata or gaten, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gata

Noun[edit]

gate f (definite singular gata, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

References[edit]