geit

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-. Compare West Frisian geit, German Geiß, English goat, Danish ged, Icelandic geit.

Noun[edit]

geit f (plural geiten, diminutive geitje n)

  1. goat

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

geitur

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

geit f (genitive singular geitar, plural geitir)

  1. goat

Declension[edit]

f2 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative geit geitin geitir geitirnar
Accusative geit geitina geitir geitirnar
Dative geit geitini geitum geitunum
Genitive geitar geitarinnar geita geitanna

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

geit f (genitive singular geitar, nominative plural geitur)

  1. a goat

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

geit f (genitive geite, nominative plural geiteanna)

  1. a jump, a start

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
geit gheit ngeit
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-.

Noun[edit]

geit f, m (definite singular geita or geiten, indefinite plural geiter, definite plural geitene)

  1. a goat

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-.

Noun[edit]

geit f (definite singular geita, indefinite plural geiter, definite plural geitene)

  1. a goat

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayd-.

Noun[edit]

geit c

  1. goat