gost

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See also: goşt

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gost, see below.

Noun[edit]

gost (plural gosts)

  1. Obsolete form of ghost.
    • 1600, Richard Hakluyt, Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation[1], edition reprint, Kessinger Publishing, ISBN 9781419178733, published 2004, page 68:
      ... may non evylle gost entre ne come unto the place that it is inne.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • gost in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gāst, from Proto-Germanic *gaistaz.

Noun[edit]

gost (plural gostes)

  1. a spiritual being; angel, devil, spirit; soul of a dead person
    • 1386, Chaucer, Legend of Good Women:
      This nyght my faderes gost Hath in my slep so sore me tormented.
    • 1500, The Towneley Plays:
      The gost went to hell a pase whils the cors lay slayn, And broght the sawles from sathanas.
    • 1525, English Conquest of Ireland:
      The dede to areren, yuel gostes to quethen.
  2. the Holy Ghost
    • Goddes gost is þe geven. — Cleanness, c1400
  3. A villain, scoundrel; a devil incarnate; a wicked-looking creature
    • In þat doynge Paternus the monk semeþ a lewed goost. — Polychronicon Ranulphi Higden, 1387
  4. The soul of man, spiritual nature
    • ᵹe cursed gostes, goþ in-to þe pyne of helle! — Seint Ieremie telleþ, c1400
    • Lyfe is none quen gost is lede. — A Stanzaic Life of Christ, 1500
  5. A spiritual force or insight, a gift of prophecy
    • A haþel in þy holde..hatz þe gostes of God þat gyes alle soþes. — Cleanness, c1400
  6. A breath, blowing, wind; God's breath, a spiritual wind; the blowing of storm
    • Gost-wynd nedefull is to recouer monnes gost þat greued is. — A Stanzaic Life of Christ, 1500
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Derived terms[edit]

  • gosted — endowed with a spirit, immortal
  • gostful — like a ghost, ghostly; spiritual
  • gostli — spiritually
  • gostlihede, gostlihod — spiritual conduct, spiritual love, devoutness, piety
  • gostliness — spiritual matters, spirituality; devoutness, piety.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary, "gost"

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gustus. Numerous cognates include Italian gusto and French goût

Noun[edit]

gost m (plural gosts)

  1. taste (of food, drink, etc.)

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gostь, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡôːst/, /ɡôst/

Noun[edit]

gȏst m (Cyrillic spelling го̑ст)

gȍst m (Cyrillic spelling го̏ст)

  1. guest
    Svakog gosta tri dana dosta. - [For] every guest three days is enough. (proverb)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Речник српскохрватскога књижевног језика (1990, Друго фототипско издање), Матица српска, Matica hrvatska (Нови Сад, Zagreb), volume 1, page 542
  • gost” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gostь, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gòst m anim (genitive gôsta, nominative plural gôstje or gôsti)

  1. guest
Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gǫstъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

góst (comparative gostêjši, superlative nàjgostêjši)

  1. dense
Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Zazaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Persian گوشت (gušt).

Noun[edit]

gost

  1. meat