gouge

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Noun from Old French gouge, itself from Late Latin gulbia (piercer), from Gaulish (compare Scottish Gaelic gilb (chisel), Welsh gylyf (sickle)), from *gulbi (beak) (compare Old Irish gulba, Welsh gylf, Old Breton golb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gouge (plural gouges)

  1. A cut or groove, as left by something sharp.
    The nail left a deep gouge in the tire.
  2. A chisel, with a curved blade, for scooping or cutting holes, channels, or grooves, in wood, stone, etc.
    • 1823, James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers, ch. 8,
      The "steeple" was a little cupola, reared on the very centre of the roof, on four tall pillars of pine that were fluted with a gouge, and loaded with mouldings.
  3. A bookbinder's tool with a curved face, used for blind tooling or gilding.
  4. An incising tool that cuts forms or blanks for gloves, envelopes, etc.. from leather, paper, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  5. (mining) Soft material lying between the wall of a vein and the solid vein.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
  6. (slang) Imposition; cheat; fraud.
  7. (slang) An impostor; a cheat.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gouge (third-person singular simple present gouges, present participle gouging, simple past and past participle gouged)

  1. (transitive) To make a mark or hole by scooping.
    Japanese and Chinese printers used to gouge characters in wood.
  2. (transitive or intransitive) To push, or try to push the eye (of a person) out of its socket.
  3. (transitive) To charge an unreasonably or unfairly high price.
    They have no competition, so they tend to gouge their customers.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (make a mark or hole by scooping): engrave
  • (charge an unreasonable price): swindle

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • gouge” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin gulbia (Late Latin gubia), of Gaulish or Basque origins.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gouge f (plural gouges)

  1. gouge (groove)
  2. gouge (tool)
  3. (obsolete) female servant
  4. (archaic) prostitute
    • 1857, Charles Baudelaire, Bribes - Damnation,
      On peut les comparer encore à cette auberge, / Espoir des affamés, où cognent sur le tard, / Blessés, brisés, jurant, priant qu’on les héberge, / L’écolier, le prélat, la gouge et le soudard.
      They can also be compared to this inn, / Hope to the starved, where in the night knock, / Injured, broken, cursing, begging to be lodged, / The schoolboy, the prelate, the prostitute and the soldier.

Verb[edit]

gouge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gouger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gouger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gouger
  5. second-person singular imperative of gouger

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

gouge f (oblique plural gouges, nominative singular gouge, nominative plural gouges)

  1. gouge (tool)
  2. (chiefly pejorative) woman

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]