grame

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grame, gram, grome, from Old English grama (rage, anger, trouble, devil, demon), from Proto-Germanic *gramô (anger), *gramaz (fiend, enemy), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrem- (to rub, grind, scrape). Cognate with Middle Low German gram (anger), German Gram (grief, sorrow), Old Danish gram (devil), Icelandic gramir, gröm (fiends, demons). Related to grim.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

grame (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Anger; wrath; scorn; bitterness; repugnance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) Sorrow; grief; misery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    • c. 1557 (published), Sir Thomas Wyatt, And Wilt Thou Leave me Thus?, lines 3 and 4:
      To save thee from the blame / Of all my grief and grame.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gramen, gramien, from Old English gramian, gremian (to anger, enrage), from Proto-Germanic *gramjaną (to grill, vex, irritate, grieve), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrem- (to rub, grind, scrape). Cognate with German grämen (to grieve), Danish græmme (to grieve), Swedish gräma (to grieve, mortify, vex).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

grame (third-person singular simple present grames, present participle graming, simple past and past participle gramed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To vex; grill; make angry or sorry.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To grieve; be sorry.
Related terms[edit]

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grame f

  1. feminine plural of gramo