grunt

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English grunten, from Old English grunnettan (to grunt), from Proto-Germanic *grunnatjaną (to grunt), frequentative of Proto-Germanic *grunnōną (to grunt), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrun- (to shout). Cognate with German grunzen (to grunt), Danish grynte (to grunt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grunt (plural grunts)

  1. A short, snorting sound, often to show disapproval, or used as a reply when one is reluctant to speak.
  2. The snorting cry of a pig.
  3. Any fish of the perciform family Haemulidae.
  4. (Army and United States Marine Corps slang) An infantry soldier. (From the verb, just like all the other senses.[1])

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grunt (third-person singular simple present grunts, present participle grunting, simple past and past participle grunted)

  1. (intransitive) Of a person: To make a grunt or grunts.
    • Shakespeare
      to grunt and sweat under a weary life
  2. (intransitive) Of a pig: To make a grunt or grunts.
  3. (intransitive, UK, slang) To break wind; to fart.
    Who just grunted?

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ grunt” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grunt m

  1. soil (in construction and geology)
  2. ground (the bottom of a body of water)

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Grund.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grȕnt m (Cyrillic spelling гру̏нт)

  1. (regional) plot of land, lot

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grunt

  1. absolute indefinite neuter form of grund.

Adverb[edit]

grunt

  1. shallowly
    gentemot såväl grundt rationalistiska som känslosamt svärmiska religiösa riktningar.
    towards both shallowly rationalistic and emotionally fanatical religious tendencies.