haber

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See also: Haber

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber), from Arabic خبر (xábar).

Noun[edit]

haber m

  1. news

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have).

Verb[edit]

haber

  1. there be
    Hai muncha diferencia.
    There's a big difference.
  2. have to, be necessary (to)
    hai que coyer la carretera.
    You have to take the road.
  3. to introduce the time ago that something happened
    Hai tres años que se creó l'asociación.
    The association was created three years ago.
  4. have (used to create perfect tenses)
    había nacíu.
    He had been born.

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have).

Verb[edit]

haber (first-person singular present hei, first-person singular preterite houben, past participle habido)

  1. (auxiliary verb taking past participle to build perfect tense) to have
  2. first-person singular personal infinitive of haber
  3. third-person singular personal infinitive of haber

Conjugation[edit]

See also[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish, from Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have).

Verb[edit]

haber

  1. to have

Conjugation[edit]

Present ha
Past habeva
Future habera
Conditional haberea
Present participle habente
Past participle habite
Imperative habe

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber) (compare Turkish haber), from Arabic خبر (xábar).

Noun[edit]

haber m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling חאביר)

  1. news

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber), from Arabic خبر (xábar).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xǎber/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ber

Noun[edit]

hàber m (Cyrillic spelling ха̀бер)

  1. news information
  2. message
  3. sensation, feeling

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a re-Latinization of Old Spanish aver after its original etymology, Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʰh₁bʰ- (to grab, to take).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈbeɾ/, [äˈβe̞ɾ], [äˈve̞ɾ]

Verb[edit]

haber (first-person singular present he, first-person singular preterite hube, past participle habido)

  1. (auxiliary verb taking past participle to build perfect tense) to have
    He trabajado muy duro durante este mes. — “I have worked very hard during this month.”
  2. (rare or dated or idiomatic) to hold; to possess
  3. (impersonal, in third person only) to exist; “there is”, “there are” (hay); “there was”, “there were” (había)
    Hay gato encerrado. (idiomatic) — “There is a catch.”
    Había gato encerrado. (idiomatic) — “There was a catch.”
  4. (with “de” + infinitive) to have to do.
    • 1920, Alain René Le Sage, Historia de Gil Blas de Santillana, page 85:
      Aquí, me dijo, has de trabajar. — “Here, he told me, you have to work.”
  5. used to denote a past obligation
    Haberte llamado. - “I ought to have phoned you.”

Usage notes[edit]

  • (to have): haber is no longer used with the sense of ownership, except in some idioms. The modern term to express ownership is tener (to have).
  • (impersonal, in third person only, to exist): In the present indicative, the only form still in use is hay (there is, there are). The standard third person forms are used in other tenses and moods.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

haber m (plural haberes)

  1. asset
  2. history
  3. credit side

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber), from Arabic خبر (xábar).

Noun[edit]

haber (definite accusative haberi, plural haberler)

  1. news
    haberleri izliyorum - I am watching the news
  2. information
    haberim var - I know about it (literally "I have information")
  3. knowledge

Declension[edit]