halt

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See also: Halt and hält

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English halten, from Old English healtian (to be lame, walk with a limp), from Proto-Germanic *haltōną. English usage in the sense of 'make a halt' is from the noun. Cognate with North Frisian halte, Swedish halta.

Verb[edit]

halt (third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. (intransitive) To limp; move with a limping gait.
  2. (intransitive) To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; hesitate; be uncertain; linger; delay; mammer.
    • Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 21
      How long halt ye between two opinions?
  3. (intransitive) To be lame, faulty, or defective, as in connection with ideas, or in measure, or in versification.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French halte, from Old High German halten (to hold). More at hold.

Verb[edit]

halt (third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. (intransitive) To stop marching.
  2. (intransitive) To stop either temporarily or permanently.
    • 1907, Robert Chambers, chapter 1/2, The Younger Set[1]:
      And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs [] peeped perfunctorily into the nursery [] and halted amazed.
  3. (transitive) To bring to a stop.
  4. (transitive) To cause to discontinue.
    The contract negotiations halted operations for at least a week.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt (plural halts)

  1. A cessation, either temporary or permanent.
    The contract negotiations put a halt to operations.
    • Clarendon
      Without any halt they marched.
  2. A minor railway station (usually unstaffed) in the United Kingdom.
    The halt itself never achieved much importance, even with workers coming to and from the adjacent works.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English healt (verb healtian), from Proto-Germanic *haltaz. Cognate with Danish halt, Swedish halt.

Adjective[edit]

halt (comparative more halt, superlative most halt)

  1. (archaic) Lame, limping.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Mark IX:
      It is better for the to goo halt into lyfe, then with ij. fete to be cast into hell [...].
    • Bible, Luke xiv. 21
      Bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

Verb[edit]

halt (third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. To limp.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      Do not smile at me that I boast her off,
      For thou shalt find she will outstrip all praise,
      And make it halt behind her.
  2. To waver.
  3. To falter.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt (plural halts)

  1. (dated) Lameness; a limp.

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle High German halt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. just, simply
    • 1978, Rolf Lyssy & Christa Maerker, Die Schweizermacher, (transcript):
      Chömmer halt e chli früner. Schadet a nüt.
      Then we'll just arrive a little earlier. It won't do any harm.

Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

halt

  1. lame

German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From halten

Interjection[edit]

halt!

  1. stop!, wait!

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. (colloquial) just, simply; indicating that a thing cannot be changed
    "Dann müssen wir halt härter arbeiten." (Then we’ll just have to work harder.)

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

past participle of hal

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

halt

  1. died

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt m

  1. h-prothesized form of alt

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

halt m (feminine halte)

  1. high; elevated

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. loud; loudly

Derived terms[edit]