harp

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See also: Harp

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English harpe, from Old English hearpe (harp), from Proto-Germanic *harpǭ (harp). Cognate with Scots hairp (harp), West Frisian harpe, harp (harp), Dutch harp (harp), German Harfe (harp), Swedish harpa (harp).

Harpist playing.jpg

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harp (plural harps)

  1. A musical instrument consisting of an upright frame strung with strings that are stroked or plucked with the fingers.
  2. (colloquial) A harmonica.
  3. (Scotland) A grain sieve.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

harp (third-person singular simple present harps, present participle harping, simple past and past participle harped)

  1. (usually with on) To repeatedly mention a subject.
    Why do you harp on a single small mistake? (US)
    Why do you harp on about a single small mistake? (UK)
  2. (transitive) To play on (a harp or similar instrument)
  3. (transitive) To play (a tune) on the harp.
  4. (transitive) To develop or give expression to by skill and art; to sound forth as from a harp; to hit upon.
    Thou harped my fear aright. — Shakespeare.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch harpe, from Old Dutch *harpa, from Proto-Germanic *harpǭ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harp f, m (plural harpen, diminutive harpje n)

  1. harp

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Arabic حرب (ḥarb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harp (definite accusative harbı, plural harplar)

  1. (dated) war

Synonyms[edit]


Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Arabic حرف (ħarf).

Noun[edit]

harp (definite accusative harpy, plural harplar)

  1. letter (of an alphabet)

Declension[edit]