holt

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English holt, from Old English holt (forest, wood, grove, thicket; wood, timber), from Proto-Germanic *hultą (wood), from Proto-Indo-European *kald-, *klād- (timber, log), from Proto-Indo-European *kola-, *klā- (to beat, hew, break, destroy, kill). Cognate with Scots holt (a wood, copse. thicket), North Frisian holt (wook, timber), West Frisian hout (timber, wood), Dutch hout (wood, timber), German Holz (wood), Icelandic holt (woodland, hillock), Old Irish caill (forest, wood, woodland), Ancient Greek κλάδος (kládos, branch, shoot, twig), Albanian shul (door latch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt (plural holts)

  1. A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
  2. The lair of an animal, especially of an otter.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hollen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hollen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. Third-person singular present of holen.
  2. Second-person plural present of holen.
  3. Imperative plural of holen.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old past participle of the verb hal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

holt

  1. dead

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt n (genitive singular holts, nominative plural holt)

  1. hillock
    • Á Sprengisandi (“On Sprengisandur”) by Grímur Thomsen
      Þey þey! þey þey! þaut í holti tófa,
      þurran vill hún blóði væta góm,
      eða líka einhver var að hóa
      undarlega digrum karlaróm;
      útilegumenn í Ódáðahraun
      eru kannske að smala fé á laun.
      Hush, hush, hush, hush,
      a vixen dashed in the hillock,
      wanting to quench his thirst with blood.
      Or - is it someone calling,
      strangely, with a harsh voice?
      Outlawed men, in the vast waste land
      are secretly guarding their stolen sheep.
  2. (antiquated) wood

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English holt.

Noun[edit]

holt

  1. A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
    Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes... -- Chaucer, Gen. Prologue, Canterbury Tales, ll. 5-6

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Noun[edit]

holt n

  1. wood