hull

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English hul (seed covering), from Old English hulu (seed covering), from Proto-Germanic *hulus (compare German Hülle, Hülse (cover, veil)), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard) (compare Old Irish calad, calath (hard), Latin callus, callum (rough skin), Old Church Slavonic калити (kaliti, to cool, harden)). For the sense development, compare French coque (nutshell; ship's hull), Ancient Greek φάσηλος (phásēlos, bean pod; yacht).

Noun[edit]

hull (plural hulls)

  1. The outer covering of a fruit or seed
Synonyms[edit]
  • (outer covering of fruit or seed): husk, shell
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull (third-person singular simple present hulls, present participle hulling, simple past and past participle hulled)

  1. To remove the outer covering of a fruit or seed.
    She sat on the back porch hulling peanuts.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 1, above.

Noun[edit]

hull (plural hulls)

  1. The body or frame of a vessel such as a ship or plane
    • Dryden
      Deep in their hulls our deadly bullets light.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull (third-person singular simple present hulls, present participle hulling, simple past and past participle hulled)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive, nautical) To drift; to be carried by the impetus of wind or water on the ship's hull alone, with sails furled
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.1:
      We goe not, but we are carried: as things that flote, now gliding gently, now hulling violently, according as the water is, either stormy or calme.
  2. (transitive) To hit (a ship) in the hull with cannon fire etc.

Estonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hull (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. crazy, mad

Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull

  1. to fall
    Hull a hó. - It's snowing. (Literally: the snow is falling)
    térdre hull - fall on one's knees
  2. (tears) to flow
  3. (hair) to fall out
  4. to die
    hullanak, mint a legyek - they are dying off like flies

Conjugation[edit]

or

Derived terms[edit]

(With verb prefixes):


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hól

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hull n (definite singular hullet, indefinite plural hull or huller, definite plural hulla or hullene)

  1. hole

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]