ik

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ic, from Old Dutch ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Low German ik, West Frisian ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg. See I (English, etymology 3).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. First-person singular, subjective: I.

Declension[edit]


Quotations[edit]

  • Julius Caesar
    Ik kwam, ik zag, ik overwon.
    I came, I saw, I conquered.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (in some dialects) I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Related terms[edit]

  • mien (possessive: my, mine); mi (dative (also generally used in place of the accusative): me); wi (plural: we)

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ik

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺

Latvian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ik

  1. every

Marshallese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. Alternative spelling of ek.

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: ic
    • Dutch: ik

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • West Frisian: ik

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • German Low German: ik

Plautdietsch[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik keem, ik keek, ik wun.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ic (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (rare) I. Now mostly used to be emphatical.
    Wha did that? Ik!(please add an English translation of this usage example)

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare North Frisian ick, Dutch ik, German Low German ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg.

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I