impetrate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the participle stem of Latin impetrāre, from im- + pātrāre (to achieve, make happen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

impetrate (third-person singular simple present impetrates, present participle impetrating, simple past and past participle impetrated)

  1. (transitive) To obtain (something) by asking for it; to procure upon request.
    • 1798, Herman Witsius, The Oeconomy of the Covenants, vol. III:
      But he that would illustrate this, should distinguish between this salvation, already impetrated or obtained, and salvation about to be impetrated; or between salvation, and the promise of salvation [...].
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, IX:
      ‘A slight testimonial, sir, which I thought fit to impetrate from that worthy nobleman’ (here he raised his hand to his head, as if to touch his hat), ‘MacCallum More.’
    • 1853, Andrew Kim, The Catholic Missionary, vol. III:
      On the cross He redeemed us with His Blood; on the altar He intercedes or impetrates that we may individually have part in that redemption.
    • 2004, Patrick Zutshi, ‘Letters of Pope Honorius III’, in Pope, Church and City:
      It is striking that the majority of these documents were issued when Dominic was present in the curia, and it is reasonable to suppose that he took a personal interest in impetrating them.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

impetrate

  1. (obsolete) obtained by entreaty
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ld. Herbert to this entry?)

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

impetrate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of impetrare
  2. second-person plural imperative of impetrare
  3. feminine plural of impetrato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

impetrāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of impetrātus