in for a dime, in for a dollar

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Alteration of “in for a penny, in for a pound”, adapted to the denominations of the American currency (£ & d$ & ¢). Nevertheless, “in for a penny, in for a pound” is used in the United States as well.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪn fɔɹ ə daɪm | ɪn fɔɹ ə ˈdɒ.lɚ/

Proverb[edit]

in for a dime, in for a dollar

  1. Americanised form of in for a penny, in for a pound.
    • 1983, Allen Drury, Decision, p. 356:
      In for a dime, in for a dollar, he thought crazily, and said what he had to say in a voice he forced to stay level and calm.
    • 1998, Ellen Miller, Like Being Killed, p. 47:
      In for a dime, in for a dollar. I whispered to Gerry, “Count me in”. Heroin was unromantic, neither sacred nor satanic; it was simply inevitable.
    • 1999, David A. Gauntlett, Insurance Coverage for Intellectual Property Assets, p. CCXCI:
      This obligation flows from the principle recognized in virtually all jurisdictions that when the policyholder is required to defend any one claim, all elements of the case must be defended (i.e., “in for a dime, in for a dollar”).
    • 2003, Leo Kolber, Leo: a life, p. 183:
      I had bought some of Cemp’s MGM stock for myself. “Listen”, I told Edgar, “in for a dime, in for a dollar”. There was no point in selling at $8. If we were going to lose we might as well lose the whole thing.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]