innate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin innātus (inborn), perfect active participle of innāscor (be born in, grow up in), from in (in, at on) + nāscor (be born); see natal, native.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

innate (not comparable)

  1. Inborn; native; natural; as, innate vigor; innate eloquence.
  2. Originating in, or derived from, the constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from experience; as, innate ideas. See a priori, intuitive.
    • South
      There is an innate light in every man, discovering to him the first lines of duty in the common notions of good and evil.
    • John Locke
      how men [] may attain to all the knowledge they have, without the help of any innate impressions
  3. (botany) Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament; as, an innate anther.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gray to this entry?)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Nouns often used with "innate": knowledge, idea, immunity, etc.

Synonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

innate (third-person singular simple present innates, present participle innating, simple past and past participle innated)

  1. To cause to exist; to call into being.

Translations[edit]

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Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

innate f pl

  1. feminine plural of innato

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

innāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of innātus