kalt

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kalt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of kallen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of kallen

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kalt

  1. neuter nominative or accusative of kaldur

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German kalt, from Proto-Germanic *kaldaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gel-. Cognate to Low German kold, koolt, Dutch koud, English cold, Danish kold, Swedish kall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kalt (comparative kälter, superlative am kältesten)

  1. cold, chilly; the physical perception of something (objects, weather, body etc.) to have a low temperature
  2. calm, restrained, passionless
  3. cold, frigid (especially when referring to emotions)

Usage notes[edit]

  • German kalt means “cold”, but not “feeling cold”; therefore the sentence Ich bin kalt (literally: I am cold) would mean that one’s body has a low temperature, particularly that one’s skin is cold on the outside. The English “I am cold” (that is: I feel cold) is equivalent to German: Mir ist kalt (literally: There is cold to me).

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • bitterkalt
  • kalt bleiben - keep one's temper
  • kalten Blutes - in cold blood
  • kalter Brand - gangrene
  • kaltes Fieber - ague

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • kalt in Duden online

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

kalt tr., 1st conj., pres. kaļu, kal, kaļ, past kalu

  1. to forge
  2. to hammer
  3. to chisel
  4. to coin (about money)
  5. to mint (about money)
  6. to shoe (about horse)
  7. to peck (about woodpecker)
  8. to hew

Declension[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kaldaz, whence also Old Saxon kald, Old English cald, Old Norse kaldr, Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌻𐌳𐍃 (kalds). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gel-.

Adjective[edit]

kalt

  1. cold

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]