kulak

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See also: kulák

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1877. From Russian кула́к (kulák, wealthy peasant; fist; tight-fisted person), plural кулаки́ (kulakí). Compare also Russian раскула́чивание (raskuláčivanije, dekulakization), подкула́чник (podkuláčnik, subkulak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kulak (plural kulaks or kulaki)

  1. (historical) A prosperous peasant in the Russian Empire or the Soviet Union, who owned land and could hire workers.
    • 2002, Christopher Hitchens, "Martin Amis: Lightness at Midnight", The Atlantic, Sep 2002:
      The "internal organs", as the CHEKA and the GPU and the KGB used to style themselves, were asked to police the mind for heresy as much as to torture kulaks to relinquish the food they withheld from the cities.

Usage notes[edit]

During Soviet state collectivization of farming in the 1920s–30s the label kulak, implying “tight-fisted”, was applied pejoratively to attack land-owning peasants in general.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Quotations[edit]

References[edit]

Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary: Tenth Edition 1997


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

kulak m (plural kulaks)

  1. (historical) kulak (prosperous peasant in Russia)

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic kulkak (“ear”), from Proto-Turkic *Kul-kak (ear).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kʰuläk/
  • Hyphenation: ku‧lak
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Noun[edit]

kulak (definite accusative kulağı, plural kulaklar)

  1. ear

Declension[edit]