laid

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

laid

  1. simple past tense and past participle of lay

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

laid (not comparable)

  1. (of paper) Marked with parallel lines, as if ribbed, from wires in the mould.

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Statistics[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French laid (hideous, ugly), from Old French laid, leid (unpleasant, horrible, odious), from Frankish *laith (unpleasant, obstinate, odious), from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz (sorrowful, unpleasant), from Proto-Indo-European *leyt- (unpleasant). Akin to Old High German leid (unpleasant, odious) (German leid (unfortunate), Leid (grief)), Old Norse leiþr (odious), Old English lāþ (unpleasant, odious). More at loath.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

laid m (feminine laide, masculine plural laids, feminine plural laides)

  1. physically ugly
  2. morally corrupt

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French laid, leid (unpleasant, horrible, odious), from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz (sorrowful, unpleasant), from Proto-Indo-European *leyt- (unpleasant).

Adjective[edit]

laid m (feminine laie, masculine plural laids, feminine plural laies)

  1. ugly
    • Bouonne femme n'est janmais laie.
      "A nice woman is never ugly."
    • Janmais vaque n'a trouvé san vieau laid.
      "A cow never found her calf ugly."

Derived terms[edit]