leam

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lemen, from Old English lȳman, *līeman (to shine), from Proto-Germanic *leuhmijaną (to shine), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljóma (to glow), Latin luminō (light up).

Verb[edit]

leam (third-person singular simple present leams, present participle leaming, simple past and past participle leamed)

  1. (intransitive, UK, dialectal) To gleam; shine; glow.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English leme, from Old English lēoma (ray of light, beam, radiance, gleam, glare, lightning), from Proto-Germanic *leuhmô (light, shine), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljómi (gleam, ray, beam, flash of light), Latin lumen (light).

Noun[edit]

leam (plural leams)

  1. (UK, dialectal) A gleam or flash of light; a glow or glowing.

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See leamer, lien.

Noun[edit]

leam (plural leams)

  1. A cord or strap for leading a dog.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Prepositional pronoun[edit]

leam

  1. with me, by me
    Is toil leam Glaschu. — I like Glasgow. (literally Is pleasure with me Glasgow.)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]