live

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See also: Live

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English liven, from Old English libban, lifian (to live), from Proto-Germanic *libjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *leip- (leave, cling, linger). Cognate with West Frisian libje, Old Saxon libbian (German Low German lęven (to live)), Dutch leven, Old High German lebēn (German leben), Old Norse lifa (Swedish leva), Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌱𐌰𐌽 (liban).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

live (third-person singular simple present lives, present participle living, simple past and past participle lived)

  1. (intransitive) To be alive; to have life.
    He's not expected to live for more than a few months.
  2. (intransitive) To have permanent residence somewhere, to inhabit, to reside.
    I live at 2a Acacia Avenue.  He lives in LA, but he's staying here over the summer.
    • 1893, Walter Besant, The Ivory Gate, Prologue:
      Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. No omnibus, cab, or conveyance ever built could contain a young man in such a rage. His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector's face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.
  3. (intransitive) To survive; to persevere; to continue.
    Her memory lives in that song.
  4. (intransitive, hyperbolic) To cope.
    You'll just have to live with it!  I can't live in a world without you.
  5. (transitive) To spend, as one's life; to pass; to maintain; to continue in, constantly or habitually.
    To live an idle or a useful life.
    • 1921, Juanita Helm Floyd, Women in the Life of Balzac:
      Many people write their romances, others live them; Honore de Balzac did both.
    • 2011 December 19, Kerry Brown, “Kim Jong-il obituary”, The Guardian:
      By 1980, South Korea had overtaken its northern neighbour, and was well on its way to being one of the Asian tigers – high-performing economies, with democratic movements ultimately winning power in the 1990s. The withdrawal of most Soviet aid in 1991, with the fall of the Soviet empire, pushed North Korea further down. Kim Il-sung had held a genuine place on North Korean people's affections. His son was regarded as a shadowy playboy, with rumours circulating over the years that he imported Russian and Chinese prostitutes, and lived a life of profligacy and excess.
    • 2013 June 1, “Towards the end of poverty”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 11: 
      But poverty’s scourge is fiercest below $1.25 (the average of the 15 poorest countries’ own poverty lines, measured in 2005 dollars and adjusted for differences in purchasing power): people below that level live lives that are poor, nasty, brutish and short.
  6. (transitive) To act habitually in conformity with; to practice.
    • John Foxe (1516/7-1587)
      to live the Gospel
    • 2006, Laura Cardone, Motivation at Work:
      Change happens from the inside out and this great resource can show you how to live the habits that build personal and professional effectiveness.
  7. To outlast danger; to float; said of a ship, boat, etc.
    No ship could live in such a storm.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See alive

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

live (not comparable)

  1. (only used attributively) Having life; that is alive.
    The post office will not ship live animals.
  2. Being in existence; actual
    He is a live example of the consequences of excessive drinking.
  3. Having active properties; being energized.
  4. Operational; being in actual use rather than in testing.
  5. (engineering) Imparting power; having motion.
    the live spindle of a lathe
  6. (sports) Still in active play.
    a live ball
  7. (broadcasting) Seen or heard from a broadcast, as it happens.
    The station presented a live news program every evening.
  8. Of a performance or speech, in person.
    This nightclub has a live band on weekends.
  9. Of a recorded performance, made in front of an audience, or not having been edited after recording.
  10. Of firearms or explosives, capable of causing harm.
    The air force practices dropping live bombs on the uninhabited island.
  11. (circuitry) Electrically charged or energized, usually indicating that the item may cause electrocution if touched.
    Use caution when working near live wires.
  12. (poker) Being a bet which can be raised by the bettor, usually in reference to a blind or straddle.
    Tommy's blind was live, so he was given the option to raise.
  13. Featuring humans; not animated, in the phrases “live actors” or “live action”.
  14. Being in a state of ignition; burning.
    a live coal; live embers
  15. (obsolete) Full of earnestness; active; wide awake; glowing.
    a live man, or orator
  16. (obsolete) Vivid; bright.
    • Thomson
      the live carnation
Usage notes[edit]
  • Live in the sense of "having life" is used only attributively (before a noun), as in "live animals". Predicatively (after the noun), alive is used, as in "be alive". Living may be used either attributively or predicatively.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Compounds[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adverb[edit]

live (comparative more live, superlative most live)

  1. Of an event, as it happens; in real time; direct.
    The concert was broadcast live by radio.
  2. Of making a performance or speech, in person.
    He'll be appearing live at the auditorium.
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verbal form of the noun liv (life).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /liːvə/, [ˈliːwə]

Verb[edit]

live (imperative liv, infinitive at live, present tense liver, past tense livede, past participle har livet)

  1. enliven
Usage notes[edit]

Used with op (up): live op

Etymology 2[edit]

From English live (1965).

Adverb[edit]

live

  1. live (as it happens)
Synonyms[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

live (lative liven)

  1. (neologism) on the left

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

live

  1. (dialectal) lye
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English live.

Adverb[edit]

live (not comparable -)

  1. live

German[edit]

Adverb[edit]

live

  1. (of an event) live (as it happens; in real time; direct)

External links[edit]

  • live in Duden online

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

live (invariable)

  1. Performed or recorded live

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

līvē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of līveō