loge

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See also: logé and Loge

English[edit]

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Loges in an opera house.

Etymology[edit]

From French loge (arbor, covered walk-way) from Frankish *laubja (shelter). Akin to Old High German. louba "porch, gallery" (German Laube "bower, arbor"), Old High German. loub "leaf, foliage", Old English lēaf "leaf, foliage". More at lobby, loggia, leaf.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loge (plural loges)

  1. A booth or stall.
  2. The lodge of a concierge.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 70:
      About three in the morning, Nora knocked at the little glass door of the concierge's loge, asking if the doctor was in.
  3. An upscale seating region in a modern concert hall or sports venue, often in the back lower tier, or on a separate tier above the mezzanine.
    • 2006, George Gmelch and J.J. Weiner, In the Ballpark: The Working Lives of Baseball People[1], ISBN 0803271271, page 151:
      In major league stadiums the press box is usually located between the first and second decks in the loge level.
  4. An exclusive box or seating region in older theaters and opera houses, having wider, softer, and more widely spaced seats than in the gallery.
    • 2002, Downing A. Thomas, Aesthetics of Opera in the Ancien Régime, 1647-1785[2], ISBN 0521801885, page 274:
      Patte notes that the spectators who were seated there were too close to the action to frame it as real, and that the loges in the avant-scène hampered the effect of the voice.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

loge

  1. singular past subjunctive of liegen

Verb[edit]

loge

  1. singular present subjunctive of logen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French , from Old Frankish *laubja. The Masonic sense developed under influence from English lodge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loge f (plural loges)

  1. (freemasonry) lodge
  2. (theater) box
  3. (obsolete) hut

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loge

  1. A backstage dressing room for actors at a theatre.
  2. A private seating chamber at a theatre.
  3. A section or local chapter of a freemason order.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loge

  1. A barn with a strong and flat wooden floor, suitable for threshing or dancing.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See le (smile)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

loge

  1. subjunctive of le.

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

loge

  1. dative singular of log