lurch

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See also: Lurch

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

lurch (plural lurches)

  1. A sudden or unsteady movement.
    the lurch of a ship, or of a drunkard
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Yet I hoped by grouting at the earth below it to be able to dislodge the stone at the side; but while I was considering how best to begin, the candle flickered, the wick gave a sudden lurch to one side, and I was left in darkness.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lurch (third-person singular simple present lurches, present participle lurching, simple past and past participle lurched)

  1. To make such a sudden, unsteady movement.
  2. (obsolete) To leave someone in the lurch; to cheat.
    • South
      Never deceive or lurch the sincere communicant.
  3. (obsolete) To steal; to rob.
    • Shakespeare
      And in the brunt of seventeen battles since / He lurched all swords of the garland.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin lurcare.

Verb[edit]

lurch (third-person singular simple present lurches, present participle lurching, simple past and past participle lurched)

  1. (obsolete) To swallow or eat greedily; to devour; hence, to swallow up.
    • Francis Bacon
      Too far off from great cities, which may hinder business; too near them, which lurcheth all provisions, and maketh everything dear.

Etymology 3[edit]

French lourche (deceived, embarrassed; also the name of a game).

Noun[edit]

lurch (countable and uncountable, plural lurches)

  1. An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables.
  2. A double score in cribbage for the winner when his/her adversary has been left in the lurch.
    • Walpole
      Lady Blandford has cried her eyes out on losing a lurch.

Anagrams[edit]