milord

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French milord, from English my lord.

Noun[edit]

milord (plural milords)

  1. (UK, obsolete, humorous) An English nobleman, especially one traveling Europe in grand style; a wealthy British gentleman.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, 49
      Not since the year 17--, when milord Castlebrilliant's curricle was whirled to sea with her ladyship within, had there been such vehement weather.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A variant spelling of m'lord, elided from my + lord.

Noun[edit]

milord (plural milords)

  1. alternative form of m'lord
    • 1986, Ben Elton & al., Blackadder II, 3: "Potato"
      Aah-ahhh! You have a woman’s hand, milord! I’ll wager these dainty pinkies never weighed anchor in a storm.
      Well, you’re right there.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English milord, from my + lord.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

milord m (plural milords)

  1. (archaic) Milord, an English lord abroad
    1959, Edith Piaf singing Georges Moustaki's "Milord"
    Laissez-vous faire, Milord,
    Venez dans mon royaume:
    Je soigne les remords,
    Je chante la romance,
    Je chante les milords
    Qui n'ont pas eu de chance!
    Let yourself go, Milord.
    Come into my kingdom:
    I treat your remorse,
    I sing of romance,
    I sing of milords
    who've never had a chance!

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English milord.

Noun[edit]

milord m (invariable)

  1. lord, milord
  2. dandy (elegant man)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English milord.

Noun[edit]

milord m (plural milords)

  1. (Jersey) swell

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English milord.

Noun[edit]

milord m (plural milores)

  1. milord