minatory

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French minatoire, from Latin minatorius, from minari (to threaten).

Cognate to menace.

Adjective[edit]

minatory (comparative more minatory, superlative most minatory)

  1. Threatening, menacing.
    • 1887: Number 3, Lauriston Gardens wore an ill-omened and minatory look. — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet
    • 1997: In the cottage next to the post office Alma Crumble broke her wrist stirring batter, at which the Bug declared in a minatory tone that 'That was enough of that.' — Edward Gorey, The Haunted Tea-Cosy
    • 1995: She shook hands firmly with Adam Dalgleish and gave him a minatory glance as if welcoming a new patient from whom she expected trouble — P.D. James, The Black Tower

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]