moan

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See also: möän and Moan

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mone, mane, man, from Old English *mān (complaint, lamentation), from Proto-Germanic *mainō. Inferred from Old English mǣnan (to complain over, grieve, mourn). More at mean.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moan (plural moans)

  1. a low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

moan (third-person singular simple present moans, present participle moaning, simple past and past participle moaned)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To complain about; to bemoan, to bewail; to mourn. [from 13th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      Much did the Craven seeme to mone his case […].
    • Prior
      Ye floods, ye woods, ye echoes, moan / My dear Columbo, dead and gone.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly poetic) To grieve. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To distress (someone); to sadden. [15th-17th c.]
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      which infinitely moans me
  4. (intransitive) To make a moan or similar sound. [from 18th c.]
  5. (transitive) To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice. [from 19th c.]
    ‘Please don't leave me,’ he moaned.
  6. (intransitive, colloquial) To complain; to grumble. [from 20th c.]

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Translations[edit]

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See also[edit]

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Breton[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moan

  1. thin, slender

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Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

moan

  1. Genitive singular form of moa.

Anagrams[edit]