modality

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

modality (plural modalities)

  1. the fact of being modal
  2. (logic) the classification of propositions on the basis on whether they claim possibility, impossibility, contingency or necessity; mode
  3. (linguistics) the inflection of a verb that shows how its action is conceived by the speaker; mood
  4. (medicine) A method of diagnosis or therapy.
    • 2001, Gregory Keller, Victor Lacombe, Lasers in Aesthetic Surgery, page 188:
      If a port-wine stain has been treated with another modality, such as the argon, C02, or KTP laser, electrocautery, radiation, or tattooing, FPDL treatment may provide less lightening and improvement.
    • 2006, Richard A. Helms, David J. Quan, Textbook of Therapeutics: Drug And Disease Management, page 2487:
      The four major modalities used in patients with solid tumors are (a) surgery, (b) radiation therapy, (c) chemotherapy, and (d) immunotherapy
    • 2010, Ellen Hillegass, H. Steven Sadowsky, Essentials of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy:
      Exercise training is a therapeutic modality that should be considered for all patients with ventricular dysfunction
    • 2011, George M. Kapalka, Pediatricians and Pharmacologically Trained Psychologists, page 7:
      In general, pharmacotherapy is less effective as a single modality approach than psychotherapy when treating chronic depression with an Axis II disorder.
  5. Any of the senses (such as sight or taste)
  6. (semiotics) a particular way in which the information is to be encoded for presentation to humans, i.e. to the type of sign and to the status of reality ascribed to or claimed by a sign, text or genre
  7. (theology) the organization and structure of the church, as distinct from sodality or parachurch organizations
  8. (music) the subject concerning certain diatonic scales known as musical modes
  9. (sociology) a concept in Anthony Giddens structuration theory

Translations[edit]

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See also[edit]