motu proprio

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From post-classical Latin motu proprio, from ablative form of classical Latin motus (motion) + proprius (one’s own).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /məʊtuːˈpɹɒpɹɪəʊ/

Adverb[edit]

motu proprio (not comparable)

  1. Of one’s own free will, of one’s own volition.

Noun[edit]

motu proprio (plural motu proprios)

  1. A document issued by the Pope on his own initiative directed to the Roman Catholic Church.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From post-classical Latin motu proprio, from ablative form of classical Latin motus (motion) + proprius (one’s own).

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “directly from Latin, or via French or what?”

Pronunciation[edit]

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Adverb[edit]

motu proprio

  1. motu proprio
    • 2008, Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Het spel van de engel, Signatuur, Utrecht, translated by Nelleke Geel
      Mijn instinct zei me dat als hij me weer wilde zien, hij dat motu proprio zou doen en wat deze onvermijdelijke ontmoeting betrof, voelde ik niet de geringste haast.
      My instinct told me that if he wanted to see me again, he would do so motu proprio and concerning this unavoidable meeting, I didn’t feel the least of haste.