neger

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Neger

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French nègre, from Spanish negro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neger (plural negers)

  1. (now chiefly Caribbean) A Negro. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1700, ‘The Saint Turn'd Sinner’ (ballad):
      The Parson still more eager, / Than lustful Turk or Neger, / Took up her lower Garment, / And said there was no harm in't, / According to the Text.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Teacup clipart.svg The Tea room(+) is discussing this entry at the moment.
Please come along and share your opinions on this and the other topics being discussed there.

Etymology[edit]

From French nègre, from Spanish negro, from Latin niger (black).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /neːjər/, [ˈneːjɐ]

Noun[edit]

neger c (singular definite negeren, plural indefinite negere)

  1. (offensive, see usage notes) A dark-skinned person, especially a person of, or primarily of, Negro descent.
  2. ghostwriter

Usage notes[edit]

The term neger is mostly considered offensive and politically incorrect. Instead the term sort (black) is preferred used. Among people above 65 years old or so, the term doesn't tend to have an offensive meaning and is therefore still used to describe a dark-skinned person.

Synonyms[edit]

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neger m (plural negers, diminutive negertje n, feminine negerin)

  1. A (male) negro.

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

neger

  1. bankrupt; broke

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

neger

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of negō

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French nègre, from Spanish negro, from Latin niger (black).

Noun[edit]

neger m

  1. negro

Usage notes[edit]

This term might be considered derogatory.

Inflection[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

neger c

  1. a negro, a black person

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The word, having derogatory connotations, has been avoided since the 1960s, primarily in favor of svart (black) and afrikan (African)

Related terms[edit]