nia

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See also: nĩa

Abenaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to Penobscot nis (I).

Pronoun[edit]

nia

  1. I (the singular first person pronoun)

References[edit]

  • 1884, Jos. Laurent, New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues
  • 1902, J. Dyneley Prince, The Differentiation Between the Penobscot and the Canadian Abenaki Dialects, in the American Anthropologist, volume 4

Esperanto[edit]

Determiner[edit]

nia (plural niaj, accusative singular nian, accusative plural niajn)

  1. our

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

nia

  1. third-person singular past historic of nier

Anagrams[edit]


Ido[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

nia

  1. our

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish nïa, in turn from Primitive Irish ᚅᚔᚑᚈᚈᚐ (niotta) (genitive), from Proto-Celtic *neɸāt- (nominative Proto-Celtic *neɸūss, compare Welsh nai), from Proto-Indo-European *népōts. Cognates include Sanskrit नपात् (nápāt), Old Persian 𐎴𐎱𐎠 (napā), Ancient Greek ἀνεψιός (anepsiós), Latin nepos, and Old English nefa.

Noun[edit]

nia m (genitive nia, nominative plural nianna)

  1. nephew

Coordinate terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nia

  1. no, not (after a negative) any

Adverb[edit]

nia

  1. nothing, anything
  2. at all

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Primitive Irish ᚅᚔᚑᚈᚈᚐ (niotta) (genitive), from Proto-Celtic *neɸāt- (nominative Proto-Celtic *neɸūss, compare Welsh nai), from Proto-Indo-European *népōts. Cognates include Sanskrit नपात् (nápāt), Old Persian 𐎴𐎱𐎠 (napā), Ancient Greek ἀνεψιός (anepsiós), Latin nepos, and Old English nefa.

Noun[edit]

nïa m (dental stem, genitive nïad or nïeth)

  1. nephew, sister's son.

References[edit]

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1] s.v. 2 nia

Penobscot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to Abenaki nis (I).

Pronoun[edit]

nia

  1. I (the singular first person pronoun)

References[edit]

  • 1902, J. Dyneley Prince, The Differentiation Between the Penobscot and the Canadian Abenaki Dialects, in the American Anthropologist, volume 4
  • 1918, Frank G. Speck, Newell Lion, Penobscot Transformer Tales, in the International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 1, number 3 (August 1918)

Swahili[edit]

Noun[edit]

nia (needs class)

  1. intention (course intended to follow)


This Swahili entry was created from the translations listed at intention. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see nia in the Swahili Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) July 2009


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the digit nio (nine)

Noun[edit]

nia c

  1. nine; the digit "9"
  2. ninth-grader; pupil in the ninth and last year of compulsory school
  3. a class of ninth-graders
  4. (uncountable, mainly used in the definite) the ninth year in school
    De barnen går i nian.
    Those children are in ninth grade.
  5. a person who finish a competition as number nine
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From ni (you) +‎ -a, a common way of forming verbs in Swedish. First attested in 1731.[1]

Verb[edit]

nia

  1. to address someone with ni (rather than du) as a sign of respect or deference
Antonyms[edit]
Usage notes[edit]

The term nia has varied considerably over time and location. After the 1960s and 1970s, the word du has in Sweden been used almost exclusively as second person personal pronoun, with a slight change in the late 1990s and early 2000s, when, for example, staff in restaurants and shops began to use ni towards the customers. Before the 1960s, however, there was a difference in use between Sweden and Finland: in both cases du was mainly used within family, among close friends, and when speaking to children. In Sweden, people with higher social statuses usually were addressed with surname and/or title, or if those were unknown, by reconstructing the sentence to use the passive voice or by using herr (Mr.), fru (Mrs.), or fröken (Miss), whereas people with lower statuses were addressed using ni. In Finland, the difference in status was not as commonly taken into account, and instead ni was used as the polite choice of pronoun regardless of social status.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Svenska Akademiens ordbok, column D2307