nidor

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nidor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nidor (plural nidor)

  1. The smell of burning animals, especially of burning animal fat.
    • 1743, Thomas Stackhouse, A Compleat Body of Speculative and Practical Divinity, edition 3 (London), page 524:
      The First-fruits were a common Oblation to their Deities; but the chief Part of their Worship consisted in sacrificiing Animals : And this they did out of a real Persuasion, that their Gods were pleased with their Blood, and were nourished with the Smoke, and Nidor of them; and therefore the more costly, they thought them the more acceptable, for which Reason, they stuck not sometimes to regale them with human Sacrifices.
    • 1896, Daniel Waterland, A Review of the Doctrine of the Eucharist, page 623:
      Elsewhere to blood, smoke, and nidor, he opposes purity of thought, sincerity of affection, []
    • 1997, Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon:
      The smell, at some times of year sensible for Miles, of Sheep, and wool-fat, and that queasy Nidor of Lambs baking in ovens meant for bread []
  2. (nonstandard) Any smell.
    • 2007, Samuel F. Pickering, Autumn spring, page 28:
      For her part Vicki smells little, not even the nidor of antifreeze at the stock car races at Lake Doucette.
    • 2008, Edgar Wallace, Devil Man, page 9:
      The long, yellow face was framed in side whiskers; there hung about him the nidor of stale cigar smoke.

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nīdor m (genitive nīdōris); third declension

  1. the steam or smell from roasting, burning or boiling (especially animals)

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative nīdor nīdōrēs
genitive nīdōris nīdōrum
dative nīdōrī nīdōribus
accusative nīdōrem nīdōrēs
ablative nīdōre nīdōribus
vocative nīdor nīdōrēs

References[edit]

  • nidor in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879