no

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Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English no, noo, na, a reduced form of none, noon, nan (none, not any) used before consonants (compare a to an), from Old English nān (none, not any), from ne (not) + ān (one), equivalent to ne (not) +‎ a. Compare Old Saxon nigēn (not any) (Low German nen), Dutch geen, Old High German nihein (German kein). More at no, one.

Determiner[edit]

no

No (not any) bricks.
  1. Not any.
    no one
    There is no water left.
    No hot dogs were sold yesterday.
    No customer personal data will be retained unless it is rendered anonymous.
  2. Not any possibility or allowance of (doing something).
    No smoking
    There's no stopping her once she gets going.
  3. Not (a); not properly, not really; not fully.
    My mother's no fool.
    Working nine to five every day is no life.
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English no, na, from Old English , (never), from Proto-Germanic *nai (never), *nē (not), from Proto-Indo-European *ne, *nē, *nēy (negative particle), equivalent to Old English ne (not) + ā, ō (ever, always). Cognate with West Frisian (no), West Frisian nea (never), Dutch nee (no), Low German nee (no), German nie (never), Icelandic nei (no). More at nay.

Adverb[edit]

no (not comparable)

  1. (largely obsolete except in Scotland) Not.
    I just want to find out whether she's coming or no.
  2. (used with comparatives) Not any, not at all.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. Used to show disagreement or negation.
    No, you are mistaken.
    No, you may not watch television now.
  2. Used to show agreement with a negative question.
    "Don’t you like milk?" "No" (i.e., "No, I don’t like milk.")
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

no (plural noes)

  1. A negating expression; an answer that shows disagreement or disapproval.
  2. A vote not in favor, or opposing a proposition.
    The workers voted on whether to strike, and there were thirty "yeses" and one "no".
Translations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + neuter singular article lo (the).

Contraction[edit]

no n (masculine nel, feminine na, masculine plural nos, feminine plural nes)

  1. in the

Awa (New Guinea)[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. water

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. no (negation; commonly used to respond negatively to a question)

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not, main negation marker
No tinc diners.
I do not have money.
No facis això.
Do not do this.

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short for ano (yes).

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well, why
    No ne!Well, I never!'

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. certainly, indeed, of course
  2. yeah, yep

Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

no (plural no-oj, accusative singular no-on, accusative plural no-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N/n.

See also[edit]


Ewe[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. breast

Verb[edit]

no

  1. To drink.
  2. To suck.

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -o

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well!
    No sepä mukavaa!
    Well, that’s nice.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

no, , (numéro)

  1. Number.

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no

Antonyms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From contraction of preposition en (in) + masculine article o (the)

Contraction[edit]

no m (feminine na, masculine plural nos, feminine plural nas)

  1. in the

Etymology 2[edit]

From a mutation of o.

Pronoun[edit]

no m (accusative)

  1. Mutated form of o. (him)
Usage notes[edit]

The n- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -u or a diphthong, and is suffixed to the preceding word

Related terms[edit]

Hawaiian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

no

  1. for, belonging to, from

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used for possessions that are inherited, out of personal control, and for things that can be got into (houses, clothes, cars), while na is used for acquired possessions.

Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no

Antonyms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
    No, ille non travalia hodie.No, he is not working today

Noun[edit]

no (plural nos)

  1. no
    Illa time audir un no.She is afraid of hearing no.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
  2. not

See also[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

no

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Ladin[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
  2. no

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Proto-Indo-European *sneh- (to flow, to swim). Compare Ancient Greek νάω (náō).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active , present infinitive nāre, perfect active nāvi ([[no passive]])

  1. to swim
    Nat lupus inter oves.
    The wolf swims between the sheep.
    Nare contra aquam.
    To swim against the stream.
    Piger ad nandum.
    Slow at swimming.
    Ars nandi.
    The art of swimming.
  2. to float
    Carinae nant freto.
    Ships float in the sea.
  3. (poetic) to sail, flow, fly, etc.
    Per medium classi barbara navit Athon.
    The barbarian youth sailed its fleet through the middle of Athos.
    Undae nantes refulgent.
    The flowing waves glitter.
  4. (of the eyes of drunken persons) to swim
    Nant oculi.
    The eyes swim.
    • Lucr. iii. 479.
      Cum vini vis penetravit,
      Consequitur gravitas membrorum, præpediuntur
      Crura vacillanti, tardescit lingua, madet mens,
      Nant oculi, clamor, sigultis, jurgia gliscunt. --
      When once the force of wine hath inly pierst,
      Limbes-heavinesse is next, legs faine would goe,
      But reeling cannot, tongue drawles, mindes disperst,
      Eyes swime, ciries, hickups, brables grow.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Lojban cardinal numbers
  no pa
    Cardinal : no

Cmavo[edit]

no (rafsi non)

  1. (cardinal) zero
  2. (as determiner) no; none
    no lo gerku pu batci le nanmu
    No dog bit the man.
    no le gerku pu batci le ta nanmu
    None of the dogs bit that man.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German nāh, from Proto-Germanic *nēhw.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

no (+ dative)

  1. after (in time)
  2. after (in a sequence)
  3. according to
  4. to, towards (a direction)

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

no

  1. nearby, near, nigh
  2. close, closely related

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse .

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no n (definite singular noet, indefinite plural no, definite plural noa)

  1. moment; point in time

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. now

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. used when finding something out; when being irritated

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Particle[edit]

no

  1. no

Antonyms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ne + ā.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. never, in no way, by no means

Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin non

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no

Antonyms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Czech no, Russian ну (nu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. (colloquial) yeah, yep
  2. (colloquial) Filled pause.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. (colloquial) Emphasis particle used with imperatives.
    • 1841, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, Szkice obyczajowe i historyczne, page 171
      ... wróciwszy z kluczem na posłanie. — Niech mnie licho porwie, jeśli cię puszczę — musisz zostać z nami. — O! figle! no! no! daj no klucza, rzekł śmiejąc się Alexy, daj no, serce, klucza! daj! Daj pokój zartom, dobranoc wam — No! daj klucza !

External links[edit]

  • no” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese no, clipping of eno, from en (in) + o (the).

Contraction[edit]

no m (plural nos, feminine na, feminine plural nas)

  1. Contraction of em o (in the).
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 546:
      Está na hora de testarmos os nossos talentos no mundo real, você não acha?
      It's time to test our talents in the real world, don't you think?

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. (objective, after verbs which end in a nasal vowel) him, it
    Eles removeram-no do grupo devido a mau comportamento da sua parte.
    They removed him from the group due to bad behavior on his behalf.
    Costumava estar aqui um copo, mas eles partiram-no quando cá estiveram.
    There used to be a glass here, but they broke it when they were here.
Synonyms[edit]

Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Numeral[edit]

no

  1. nine

Romanian[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well!

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. or
  2. nor

Shabo[edit]

Verb[edit]

no

  1. go

Siane[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. water

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish non, from Latin nōn (compare Catalan no, French non, Italian no, Portuguese não, Romanian nu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
  2. not
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Contracted form of Latin numero, ablative singular of numerus (number).

Pronunciation[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

№, No., no. (número)

  1. number

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English no

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 2:5 (translation here):
      ...i no gat diwai na gras samting i kamap long graun yet, long wanem, em i no salim ren i kam daun yet. Na i no gat man bilong wokim gaden.

Derived terms[edit]


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. full (of the stomach)
    Đang no. — I'm full.
    No bụng. — My stomach's full.

Usage notes[edit]

  • no only refers to the stomach being full, or by extension, a person having had enough to eat

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōmen (name), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

Noun[edit]

no m

  1. name

West Frisian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. now

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. eh, isn't it, true (at end of declarative sentence, forms question to prompt listener's agreement)