noir

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See also: Noir

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From film noir and French noir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

noir (comparative more noir, superlative most noir)

  1. (film, TV) Of or pertaining to film noir, or the atmosphere associated with that genre
    • 2008, Jerold J. Abrams & Elizabeth Cooke, “Detection and the Logic of Abduction in The X-Files”, in The Philosophy of TV Noir[1], ISBN 0813124492, page 182:
      As a neo-Sherlock Holmes, however, Mulder is also a very noir version of the classic detective (just as Scully is a very noir Watson).

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

noir (plural noirs)

  1. (film and TV) A production in the style of film noir

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French noir, from Old French noir, neir, from Latin niger, nigrum.

Adjective[edit]

noir m (feminine noire, masculine plural noirs, feminine plural noires)

  1. black in colour.
    Ce chat est noir. - This cat is black.
  2. drunk; inebriated.
    Il est noir. - He is drunk.
  3. black, of black ethnicity
    Il est noir. - He is black.

Noun[edit]

noir m (plural noirs, feminine noire)

  1. a black person
  2. a person whose hair is dark
  3. dark; darkness
    Je suis seul dans le noir. - I'm alone in the dark.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French noir, neir.

Noun[edit]

noir m (uncountable)

  1. black

Adjective[edit]

noir m (feminine singular noire, masculine plural noirs, feminine plural noires)

  1. black

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin niger, nigrum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

noir m (oblique plural noirs, nominative singular noirs, nominative plural noir)

  1. black (color)

Adjective[edit]

noir m (feminine noire)

  1. black; having a black color

Descendants[edit]